<![CDATA[RepairLabs Blog]]> Thu, 04 Sep 2014 22:39:31 +0000 en hourly 1 <![CDATA[RepairLabs Tests Liquipel's Watersafe Treatment ]]> Fri, 17 Jan 2014 16:28:52 +0000 RepairLabs, Water Damage, and Liquipel!

Here at RepairLabs, we deal with water damaged smart phones and tablets on a daily basis, and get asked quite often by the poor victims of water damage what they can do to help protect their phone. Besides the obvious advice to not get your phone wet, there really isn't much we can offer them in the way of protecting it after we've gone in and fixed it.

With that in mind, we were approached by Liquipel not too long ago after doing our Guide to Dealing with a Water Damaged Phone. Liquipel was interested in showcasing their product to us, so that we could do some unbiased testing on the effectiveness of their coating, and to be able to effectively tell if it is indeed a good investment for those of you who are prone to soaking your favorite portable device. To help keep the testing relevant to most readers, we sent Liquipel one of the most common devices on the market, the iPhone 4.

First off, to talk about the process as a whole, we'd just like to state that the folks at Liquipel have been great to work with, always being prompt in response to any questions we've had about the process, and having a quick turnaround rate for a primarily mail-in based company. (which we know a little something about!)

The Liquipel-Coated iPhone Returns

Upon getting the iPhone 4 back from Liquipel, we were greeted by this awesome Liquipel tin case. From there the experience only got better, with there being a large foam cover directly below the top of the case.

 

Liquipel Shipping Case

Underneath that, the phone was stored in a little shipping bag and encased in foam, making sure that your precious device doesn't get damaged during the return shipping. Nice touch, Liquipel!

As for the iPhone 4 itself, you can see that it came back a bit dirty, but other than that, in perfect working condition!

Liquipel vs. Pool Water

A little bit of information on the Liquipel process: Liquipel is a nano coating that surrounds all the tiny little electrical parts in and around your device. It’s completely invisible to the human eye and will not void your warranty. While we can’t say your device is waterproof, we can proudly stand by our hydrophobic technology and say it’s great for accidental occurrences.

Both us here at RepairLabs and Liquipel agreed that we should keep the testing simple to help avoid any confusions on what the Liquipel coating actually protects you from, so with that in mind, we agreed upon a test that involved three inches of pool water, which is a combination of chlorine and typical tap water, with the Liquipel-coated iPhone 4 and the uncoated iPhone 4 going in horizontally for 60 seconds, then removed and sat out to dry for a full 24 hours before opening the phones up.

As you'd expect from testing as simple as this, the testing went perfectly, with both iPhones getting a nice soak in the pool water for an entire minute before being removed. After we removed them from the water, we sat them aside on a microfiber cloth to air dry without being touched for the next 24 hours.

24 Hours Later

After sitting out for the next 24 hours, we carefully removed the back covers from both iPhones, and were greeted with not-so-surprising results. Liquipel claims that their coating will protect you from your average accident involving liquids, not a coating that would survive a couple days in the Ocean, and the results show just that, with the Liquipel-coated phone being completely dry.

Both phones side-by-side show very different results, with the uncoated phone still having expected water residue on the battery, even though the outside of the phone has almost completely dried-up, whereas the Liquipel phone looked as if it hadn't even been in the water at all.

What does all this mean for you, the consumer? It means that if you're accident prone around water, Liquipel is not just a worthy investment, but an investment that we here at RepairLabs absolutely recommend!

You're not paying for a super-fancy coating, (well you are) you're paying for the peace-of-mind in knowing that your phone can withstand just a little bit more punishment from you before it croaks. And if you have a device that has already taken a spill, call the experts here at RepairLabs, we'll get you fixed up and running like new in no time.

Note that both RepairLabs and Liquipel do not recommend getting your device wet on purpose, and that the Liquipel Watersafe Treatment is only meant for accidental exposure.

We'd like to thank Liquipel for working with us on this article, and hope that you've found the information presented helpful in making an informed-decision on whether Liquipel is a good investment for you.

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<![CDATA[iPhone 5s Touch ID scanner not usable in less than perfect conditions]]> Fri, 20 Sep 2013 18:20:26 +0000 iPhone 5s Touch ID - fingerprint identity sensor

It’s no secret that Apple is known for their innovative, cutting-edge products, and the iPhone 5S with the Touch ID will only raise the bar in this ever-changing world of technology.  Early this morning Apple released the iPhone 5S equipped with a fingerprint identification sensor, which allows you to unlock your device using your fingerprint! Sounds awesome, right? This new feature, called “Touch ID”, promises to be unlike any other fingerprint scanner that has ever been released on a mobile device, but is it? You better believe that our team of technicians, here at RepairLabs, were of the first in line to test out this product.

Admittedly, our expectations were not the highest, as in any fingerprint scanner, it is often a challenge to get it to continuously read properly.  These days, we take our phones with us everywhere and use them for nearly everything—it’s our lifeline! We thought it critical to put the functionality of “Touch ID” to the test. Will it work in less-than-stellar fingerprint conditions? Check out the results we found through our experiments below. Does “Touch ID” hold up in these common fingerprint scenarios?

Touch ID Testing Scenarios

-Clean Finger Print – Yes

-Greasy Finger Print –No

-Oily Test – Yes

-Water Test – No

-Clear Latex Glove – Yes, although it took a few tries.

-Colored Latex Glove – No

-Dirt Test – No

Paint Test – No

Flour Test – Yes

I know what you you’re thinking—how often will your hands be covered in grease, dirt, or paint? For most, the majority of negative results we found won’t make-or-break your decision on purchasing the new iPhone 5S.  However, there is one scenario we haven’t mentioned yet, and we think it’s a biggin’. Since cold temperatures are the norm in much of North America, it’s essential that the “Touch ID” feature work in colder conditions. Our team conducted a Cold Weather test and found that in below freezing temperatures, the “Touch ID” feature did not function as it should. Sorry New Yorkers, only after the device was removed from this temperature, for a minimum of two minutes, did the fingerprint sensor begin to work as it should. As we see it, this is a major oversight on Apple’s part, since this may be a huge factor when considering purchasing the iPhone 5S with the Touch ID.

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<![CDATA[Common Phone Etiquette Around The World]]> Mon, 12 Aug 2013 11:34:39 +0000 What Is 'Proper' Phone Etiquette?

Be honest, how many times have you taken your phone into the bathroom with you, whether to check your email, play Candy Crush, or do something else. We’ve all done it, and it’s not a big deal for the most part, but one of the unspoken rules of phone etiquette is that you don’t take an important call while you’re on the toilet – it’s only common courtesy.

Knowing that this is common knowledge here in the United States, we here at RepairLabs became curious on what the spoken and unspoken rules of phone courtesy and etiquette were in other countries. Initially we were thinking small, such as Canada and Mexico, but then we realized that we had the opportunity to learn about the culture of so many other great countries that we had to be as diverse as possible.

With that said, we set out to learn all we could about countries that have had cell phones since the beginning, such as China, Japan, Italy, France, and the United Kingdom, while also looking at countries that are newer to the whole cell phone shtick; Brazil, Egypt, India, Russia, and Thailand. We gathered so much great information in fact, that we decided we should put together an infographic to help the information be more easily digested!

Click the image below to open the Infographic! 

Phone Etiquette Infographic by RepairLabs

A common trend seen across almost all countries, including the U.S., that have had cell phones for quite a while is that we have unspoken understandings when it comes to when it is polite and not polite to talk on our mobile device. Some of the most common places that we understand it’s rude to talk on our cell phone include at a restaurant, the movies or a play, and most definitely during a meeting or interview!

We also have a much larger attraction to texting over talking on the phone, not only is it more convenient, it’s also silent, for the most part. If you were to go to any of the countries that are newer to the cell phone market, it’s not uncommon to see people talking on their phones pretty much anywhere they want, while also usually having no thought towards their volume level in public. This isn’t to say that the people in these countries are rude or thoughtless; it’s simply that they haven’t been trained properly in the ways of cell phone etiquette, yet.

Phone Etiquette, And Where We All Currently Stand

Not all countries are the same when it comes to the proper etiquette of when and how to use a phone. Though it’s considered rude in the U.S. or U.K to answer your phone during a face-to-face conversation with somebody else, in certain parts of the world it’s considered rude not to answer your phone, no matter what you’re doing, there is also no guarantee that if you ignore it, the person won’t just keep calling.

And while no country is perfect when it comes to phone etiquette, we could all learn something from each other. It’s completely common in Egypt to exchange pleasantries over the phone for up to five minutes before beginning the actual conversation, even if talking to a complete stranger. While five minutes may be a bit excessive it does go to show that we all have room to grow when it comes to being polite and respectful.

Even through all of our research on phone etiquette, we didn't find a single country that finds it acceptable to take an important call on the toilet. This journey taught us all a lot about common phone etiquette in many different countries, but proved that no matter where you are, dropping a log and speaking to your boss at the same time is a no-go!

We may be considered more polite than some when it comes to our usages of our cell phones, but on the phone we can be some of the most inconsiderate people. With room for all of us to expand and grow, this infographic will, hopefully, be the first step towards a more connected and unified cellular Phone world.

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<![CDATA[A Guide To Dealing With A Water Damaged Phone ]]> Mon, 05 Aug 2013 13:51:02 +0000 And Other Myths Associated With Water Damage

We here at RepairLabs spend a lot of time fixing water damaged devices. Now, most of the time, these devices require our specially-designed RepairLabs' Cleaning Process to get back into working order, still we decided it was time to answer the question we get asked all the time: “I got my phone wet, what can I do to fix it?

To do this test properly, we had to document each step of the process so that you guys can see exactly why one option is better than another. The most common thing people do when they get their device wet, is stick it in rice... That’s the worst thing you can do. Yes, rice will eventually absorb the water, what it will also do is cause massive corrosion build-up inside your device, which is the reason it isn’t working in the first place.

Rice has always been considered by many to be the top option for drying out a water damaged device, but the truth is that rice doesn’t absorb liquid out of your device very well, increasing the risk of a part shorting out inside the phone due to water, and an increased build-up of corrosion from the chlorine in the water.

What’s Up With Corrosion?

Though the general idea behind corrosion is that it makes your phone go from working to not working, which is true, but there is more to it than that. It’s time for a RepairLabs’ Super Awesome Scientific Moment!!

Corrosion is the result of an undisturbed chlorinated-liquid sitting inside your device for an extended period of time. What this chlorine does is cause corrosion, which eats away lead-free solder, causing your device to have cold joints which is a bad connection between two connectors where the solder use to be. Another issue with corrosion is that it’s conductive, which can cause parts inside your device to short out, such as the battery and LCD, etc...

Any website or person that has told you to stick your phone in rice after suffering water damage is setting you up for failure. Luckily your friends at RepairLabs are here to help you get things back in working order.

Getting Our Hands Wet With Water Damage

We used the five most common drying methods, which are; rice, an alcohol bath, desiccant crystals, a blow dryer, and running a device through RepairLabs' own Cleaning Process. For the sake of consistency, we used five iPhones that have been submerged in a bucket full of pool water, which consists of water and chlorine, since the water will be more corrosive than tap water, but not quite as bad as salt water.

Each device was submerged for five minutes, removed from the water and shaken out, then put into whatever water drying method it was selected for. After their allotted time, they were all removed and disassembled to get pictures of the rust accumulation inside and the corrosion build up on the LCD connection.

Desiccant Crystals (48hrs) – The trusty 48 hour emergency water kit. All these are is a little bag full of desiccant crystals, which are used to absorb moisture. We followed the directions on the packaging to the letter, getting the phone into the bag as quickly as possible and then sealing it for 48 hours before re-opening it.

Results – The rust build-up was pretty severe on the screws inside the phone, along with most of the back housing and metal internal components. There was also a bit of moisture still on the battery, leaving it moist in areas.

The LCD connection was surprisingly relatively clean of any corrosion, raising the chances that we would be able to fix this particular phone.

Alcohol (24hrs) – Considered by some our Certified Technicians to be the best way to save your phone after a dip in some liquid. The alcohol will help break down the water while working as a non-conductive liquid to keep your device from shorting out. Note that five to ten minutes is all that is needed in the alcohol. We let it sit in the alcohol for five minutes before removing the phone and letting it air dry for another 24 hours.

Interesting to see that the phone worked the moment we put it in the alcohol, even after sitting in the pool water for five whole minutes.

Results – Not nearly as much rust inside the phone as the crystal phone. The screws are rusted and of course the water sensor has been tripped on the phone, which is a given. There is no standing water on the battery or within the device itself, being completely dry, but you can clearly see the water damage to the battery.

Underneath the cables is the LCD connection, which is almost spotless except for the bit of corrosion on the connector itself, you can tell the corrosion by its teal color.

Blow Dryer (48hrs) – This is probably your second best bet when it comes to getting your phone working again after dropping it in water. Using a blow dryer on low heat and low speed will gently push the water molecules out of the phone from the open areas. Do this for roughly five minutes, and you’ve raised the chances of getting your phone back in working condition exponentially. After blow drying it, we let it sit for an additional 48 hours to let it completely dry out.

We used the blow dryer for five minutes on the phone, constantly turning and flipping the phone to help evaporate as much water as we could.

Results – Similar results to that of the alcohol bath phone. There is minor rust damage inside the phone besides the screws. Again the battery is pretty thrashed, which is why we call it water damage.

Not surprising, since the rest of the internals look similar, the LCD connection is roughly the same as well (in comparison to the alcohol phone), with there only being minor corrosion damage on the connector cable itself.

RepairLabs’ Cleaning Process (24hrs) – The idea here is to let the phone sit powered down for 24 hours, the average amount of time a water damaged phone sits before it is normally taken/shipped to a repair center for water damage repairs. After 24 hours, we ran the phone through our RepairLabs’ Cleaning Process to break away the corrosion.

Results – After getting the 24 hour treatment, this phone was torn apart and cleaned of all corrosion, and the results are pretty amazing, with the phone showing next to no signs of water damage after having been submerged in pool water for five minutes.

The LCD connection is spotless, with not an ounce of corrosion to be found.

Rice (72hrs) – The most misleading myth when it comes to phone repair probably ever. Putting your phone in rice is a terrible idea. The moisture absorbed is minimal at best compared to the amount of corrosion you will build in return. We let the iPhone sit inside a full bag of rice for 72 hours before opening it to check for corrosion.

Results – Wow... There really is not a better word to explain the phone after sitting in the rice for three whole days. The rust build-up is intense and there is still water on the battery itself, leading me to conclusion that the rice did an absolutely porous job of absorbing the water. In the battle between rice and water damage, water damage won hands down!

Gross, that corrosion means this phone is basically shot. Yes, it could be put through our water damage cleaning process, but there is no guarantee this phone could be saved with this much damage to the internals.

For reference, this is what an iPhone looks like after getting wet in pool water and sitting for eight whole days. The corrosion inside is so bad that this phone has probably seen its last days. Though we clean all phones that come through, not every phone can be saved.

Conclusion

The results speak for themselves. If there is no way for you to get your phone to us right away, either put your phone in a quick alcohol bath or run a blow dryer over it on low for a bit. The 48 hour emergency kits aren’t a bad idea if you’re out and about when this happens, but the two previously stated methods are cheaper and you normally have both in-house.

Putting your phone in rice doesn’t help, so don’t bother. The standing water on the battery and corrosion build-up makes it pretty clear that you’re much better off doing something else with your phone if you get it wet.

We personally recommend the blow dryer or alcohol, whichever is more convenient for you, but the reality of the situation is that choosing a repair center to handle repairing your water damaged device is your absolute best option!

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<![CDATA[RepairLabs, Helping One Kid At A Time With Canines For Disabled Kids]]> Thu, 01 Aug 2013 13:44:57 +0000 RepairLabs’ Mission

Over the course of the past year, RepairLabs, the nation's most trusted repair service has partnered with some of the finest charitable organizations around to help cloth children in China, combat diabetes, support animals in need, and help fight drug addiction. Now it’s time for RepairLabs to step in once again with our Op:HERO program to help with another major issue in our beautiful country, and that’s children with special needs who do not or cannot receive the proper help they need to lead the fullest life possible, Canines for Disabled Kids has been helping with this very issue for years, and is committed for the long haul, so we thought it was time that we got involved.

Though Canines for Disabled Kids is mostly known for the public awareness and education they spread across the nation by talking to civic/religious groups, and students of all ages, they also help promote the care of these children even further by offering Scholarships to help offset the cost of getting a service animal for your child in need. You don’t consider your child a burden, so why should an animal to better their life become one.

Getting a service dog for your child is a huge responsibility for not only the little one, but for you as a parent as well. Make sure you study the materials available on their website as much as possible before making the decision. Service dogs are there to make life a little bit easier, but still require the same amount of care that any other animal would need, as the old saying goes, everyone poops.

With years of experience in helping parents find the right animal to fit their child’s special needs, Canines for Disabled Kids will help you every step of the way, from picking the correct dog that has been specially trained, to the financial situation, all the way to getting your child the animal they deserve.

RepairLabs’ Op:HERO & Canines for Disabled Kids, A Beautiful Partnership

Our Op:HERO (Help Every Repair Overcome) program was started with these exact same ideals in mind that Canines for Disabled Kids was founded on. Helping those who need it has always been our biggest concern, and by donating to Canines for Disabled Kids, we all make sure these children get paired with the right animal to help them, and that’s what it’s all about.

RepairLabs & Canines for Disabled Kids, A Great Pairing

Each dollar you donate to Canines for Disabled Kids we’ll match, up to $100 per order, and if you’re the parent of a child you feel may be in need of one of these specially-trained animals, please head over to the Canines for Disabled Kids website to learn more.

The opportunity to help these children really gets us here at RepairLabs excited, if there is one thing we love to do, its help in any way we can, but if you’d like to make a donation without purchasing one of our fine services, you may do so here.

With hundreds of successful pairings under their belt, rest assured knowing that your donation will go toward a child in need either way, that's the RepairLabs' way. 

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<![CDATA[Why Your Cell Phone Loses Signal]]> Wed, 31 Jul 2013 11:39:41 +0000 Why Is There No Signal Bars On My Phone? Where Have They Gone?

How many times have you been in the worst situation possible, and your cell phone doesn’t have a single bar of reception. It seems like we lose signal entirely at the worst times possible. Though we here at RepairLabs can’t magically help you get bars when there are none to be had – we can help you understand why you have none, and what you can do to help improve signal.

With our super awesome interactive infographic detailing how cell phones work, and why we lose reception, you will have the tools necessary to conquer the world of mobile communication, at least as well as we possibly can.

What Makes A Cell Phone Work & Why You Lose Signal

Before we could explain why the cell phone loses signal, we first had to figure out what exactly makes your cell phone work in the first place. We all know the general gist of it -- your cell phone sends a signal to a tower and then to whoever you're calling, but there is a lot more that goes into it, and we were able to gather all this data so you don't have to!

You may hear lots of big terms and fancy words thrown around when talking to know-it-all’s about why your phone drops your call. Luckily we understand your frustration and are here to break it down into digestible bits for you.

Upon further testing and research, we've found out several extremely interesting facts about why your phone loses signal, including what materials cause the signal to be dampened, and which cause a cutoff completely.

Having figured out what is causing the signal to be lost, we were able to compile a few simple tips that can help you retrieve some of that lost reception when you need it most, and no, sitting there yelling at the top of your lungs will not help your phone get signal back.

Please click the image below to open up the full, interactive infographic! 

RepairLabs Infographic: Why does my cell phone lose signal, and how does it work?

 

Whether you are simply curious, or are furious with your cell phone for not obeying your every command, there’s something we can all learn from the information gathered, mostly being that our phones are unreliable at best.

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<![CDATA[What The iPhone 5S Would Look Like With A 4.3” Screen]]> Thu, 18 Jul 2013 10:29:09 +0000 Is Apple Gearing Up For A 4.3” iPhone 5S?

Will the iPhone 5S finally be the true innovation on an “S” model iPhone? Blasphemy! Apple has set themselves up on a pretty linear path when it comes to the launching of their iPhones. Every year somewhere between mid-summer and October they release their latest iteration in the line, starting with a whole number, such as the iPhone 5, then releasing the “S” iteration the next year, in this case being the iPhone 5S.

Now normally these “S” models offer only minor improvements over their predecessor, such as speed bumps for the CPU and minor adjustments to iOS. This year looked to be no different, until the rumors started floating around earlier this week about the delay for the iPhone 5S, due to Apple wanting to put 4.3” Displays on the device. Normally we don’t report on rumors without hard evidence, but the fact that Bloomberg felt it was worthy of being picked up intrigued us.

iPhone 5S, Made Possible By Samsung?

There are also talks that Apple is working with Samsung to get these new displays, but there is no concrete evidence that either of these rumors are true. Still, in the spirit of being geeks, we here at RepairLabs thought it would be fun to work up a mock image of what a 4.3” iPhone5S would look like in comparison to the last iPhone model, the iPhone 5.

RepairLabs' Comparison iPhone 5S vs iPhone 5 Screen Size

One of the biggest complaints about the iPhone 5 was that, yes, they made the screen bigger, but the shape of the phone was just off. Some people loved it, but just as many disliked it. If Apple really is set on moving up to a 4.3” Display, their best bet would be to expand out at an angle, making the phone wider, and less oblong shaped.

Will The iPhone 5S Change The Repair Field?

Whether the resolution would increase or not, is still up for debate. With the iPhone line already boasting the extremely sharp Retina Displays, Apple may be able to get away from boosting up the pixel count, while still offering a beautiful display. Ideally they would offer us a true HD screen this time around, possibly at 720P or even 1080P, but that’s not likely to happen, and if it will, it will most likely be on the iPhone 6 that will undoubtedly be out next year.

With RepairLabs already boasting the wholly unique Ecto-Dynamic System for fixing the current screens used on the iPhone 5, it will be interesting from a repair standpoint to see if our system will still be viable on the new iPhone 5S screens.

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<![CDATA[RepairLabs Matches with Double Donation to Provide Coats for China’s Orphans]]> Mon, 01 Jul 2013 12:33:19 +0000 RepairLabs' Op:HERO Has Teamed Up With Love Without Boundaries

Op:HERO has decided to tackle a special mission. At RepairLabs we’re teaming with our customers to provide warm coats to orphans in China through the Love Without Boundaries charitable organization. We are honored to have the opportunity to help children in need through a special use of our Op:HERO program. In the past we’ve developed relationships with other amazing charitable organizations to collect donations for them from our customers. And in the past we’ve always matched 100% of customer donations (from $1 to $100), so their gift was worth double.

RepairLabs.com and LoveWithoutBoundaries.com

Matching 200% To Make A Difference Is The RepairLabs Way

This time RepairLabs is going to match 200% of every donation.  We have the opportunity to donate a coat with every customer contribution and we’re going to stretch every dollar. Love Without Boundaries can purchase a coat for an orphan in China for only $15. We’re asking customers who’d like to participate in this program to donate just $5, and we’ll match it with the last $10. We’re asking for a little bit more from our customers, and we intend to give a lot more ourselves.

So why do we here at RepairLabs feel so passionate about this particular charity? Love Without Boundaries has been helping the neediest children in the orphanages of rural China since 2003. And since that time, the demographic face of kids in need there has changed. Instead of orphanages mainly filled with healthy baby girls, the population of orphanages has shifted to children with severe health problems or birth defects.  Most of these kids have been abandoned because their parents can’t afford to treat them or because of the stigma associated with birth defects in China, which have been on the rise with pollution.

Rural orphanages in China suffer great deprivation.  Often the children go hungry and caregivers are stretched to the limit to provide them with attention. There is no central heating in most facilities, and children from orphanages aren’t allowed to attend school with other children. Love Without Boundaries works to supplement education, nutrition, and warm clothing for these kids. They provide roads to foster homes for the neediest children, and finance many surgeries that will ultimately make these children adoptable domestically and abroad.  They wholeheartedly believe that it’s best. Their mission is to provide hope and healing to transform the lives of orphaned and impoverished children.

Operation: HERO, Logo for Charitable Donation Program at RepairLabs.com

So where does Operation HERO (Help Each Repair Overcome) fit into this picture? We wanted to help, and when we contacted Love Without Boundaries, they shared with us a need for coats for the kids.  Without central heat the children are often bundled into many layers that rarely come off, and in the frigid temperatures that can come about there, there’s a desperate need for warm clothing. We thought we could make a real difference in a little person’s life with this simple donation.  We here at RepairLabs are honored to do our small part to make a big difference in a little person’s life. And we’re extra proud that we can empower our customers to make that difference as well.

Operation HERO was started to provide an easy and inexpensive donation opportunity for our customers. Anyone making a purchase from us can choose to add a donation to one of our charities to their checkout cart, and we’ll match that donation 100%--or more! In developing relationships with multiple charities, we wanted to provide our customers with multiple options for charitable giving, and give them the chance to find a cause that resonated for them. Currently we work with an animal shelter charity, an anti-drug organization, and a diabetes cure organization, as well as Love Without  Boundaries, and we would like to continue adding more great charities those we support.  Most importantly, we think there’s a little hero in each of us, and we’d like to help our customers find that hero too.

If you feel as passionate as we do here at RepairLabs about clothing these children in need, and would like to donate directly, please visit their donation page here.

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<![CDATA[RepairLabs Makes iPhone 5 Screen Repair Affordable For All]]> Fri, 14 Jun 2013 11:54:51 +0000 Where the Phone Repair Industry Is

RepairLabs Talking Media Heads About Repairs

Those quotes above are from some of the most well-respected technical news sites around today. What they were saying was true, but it’s not anymore. With costs for iPhone 5 glass replacements ranging anywhere from $199 for a cheap repair to over $300 for a repair by a quality, trusted repair shop – the idea of fixing a broken iPhone 5 was ludicrous.

What does MarketWatch, BGR and Geek all have in common? They all agree that the cost of parts is why the iPhone 5 costs so much to get it fixed. It’s quite simple really; the OEM screens are sold at a premium, with the number available being low, which causes the repair shops to drive the price up to actually make any profit.

Almost one out of every three iPhone users will damage their phone this year... You read that right, think of how many people you know that have an iPhone. It’s an epidemic, and Repair Shops are beginning to refuse iPhone 5’s for repair because they’re not profitable for them.

What is the point of dropping that much money, when you could go out and practically buy a replacement phone for that? In the ideal world, you could have your cake, and eat it too, but that’s not the case, until now.

Is The Price Right For Repairs?

Look around the web; you’ll still see prices varying wildly, with a lot of the cheaper options being from repair shops that don’t have a solid, credible reputation. The cheapest option available to the public right now is through Apple themselves, who recently announced that they will be repairing iPhone 5 glass for $150 per unit, which is substantially less than the 3rd party shops.

The problem with going through Apple is the hassle of finding an Apple Store, scheduling an appointment to get the phone in, and then having to wait even longer while they do a full system quality check before fixing the screen. Is the price great? Sure, but it doesn’t make it any more convenient.

Try, Try, Again

Seeing how the Industry was taking such a large hit from the cost of parts with this new generation of phones, the Research and Development Department here at RepairLabs began work on a new, revolutionary process that would completely change the repair business as we know it. To this point, they’ve put over 100 hours into this new process.

RepairLabs Top Secret Work

Most companies are willing to stand idly by and only replace a handful of iPhone 5 screens each month because of the cost of the parts alone, but we weren’t satisfied with just replacing the part at a huge premium to the customer. Instead, we took the time to learn the ins and outs of the iPhone 5, what makes it such an expensive device to repair, what the common issues were, and how we could work to bring the best service available to you at a more manageable price.

Where We Are Now

It’s with great joy that I bring to you today the news that not only has our R&D Department figured out what is needed to fix the iPhone 5 instead of replace the broken screen, but also a way to do it at a price that our competitors just cannot match.

With our new specially designed RepairLabs process, we’re able to fix your iPhone 5 glass for a fraction of the cost of our competitors, while bringing you the highest quality repair possible, which is what RepairLabs has always been known for.

Our process we call the RepairLabs Ecto-Dynamic System makes it possible for us to bring you iPhone 5 glass repairs for $139, with quality that will rival any Companies replacement screens or repairs.

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<![CDATA[iOS 7 - What Was Apple Thinking?! ]]> Tue, 11 Jun 2013 17:08:18 +0000 Enter iOS 7

Please note people that the version of iOS 7 used within this post is the beta developer’s version, and that the final product may differ from what you’re about to see.

Ok for those of you didn’t hear or are living under a rock with poor internet reception, yesterday Apple announced the new iOS 7, among many other things. iOS has been criticized for a long time now for being the same with every “new” iteration. What was Apple’s answer to this? Why to pretty much blow up the look of the operating system and rebuild it.

We here at RepairLabs have gotten our hands on the new beta version of iOS 7, and are here to give you a full rundown of our thoughts and opinions on it up to this point.

The results are mixed, at best. I personally dislike the whole look. It’s like Apple thought to themselves “WWAHD?” or “What would a hipster do?” This was the result. Now for the sake of being fair, I got past my initial disgust of the design and utilized the new features to test out the actual functionality of the new iOS.

iOS 7 Design

From a design standpoint, my feelings are pretty clear. I don’t like the new look at all. The icons all have a bright, colorful vector feel to them that I feel is far too hipster for the phone’s own good. Nothing else really changed when it comes to design for the icons. You still have the standard layout with the app rows and the main functions at the bottom.

RepairLabs & iOS 7

The lock screen is one of those interesting changes. It’s essentially identical to its predecessor in how it functions, but it now looks nearly identical to a handful of Android phones.. Very interesting.

When it comes to additions to the design, this is where Apple has made improvements. With the new slide down menus on the top and bottom, which are called the Control Center and the Navigation Center, along with the redesigned unlock screen, we get the feeling that Apple has been watching the competition closely while working on this latest version.

The slide down from the top gives you access to the Navigation Center, which houses your calendar and the stock market widget. I find them to be an odd combination, but having instant access to your calendar is a handy feature.

Sliding the screen from the bottom up gives you the Control Center, much like the top bar of an Android phone. From here you can change your general settings such as WiFi and whatnot, below that is the media player, brightness, and a few of the essential apps; flashlight, (handy) stopwatch, calculator, and camera.

You may have noticed that the search page is now gone. Replacing it is this new frustrating feature where you have to do an angled swipe down to pull down the search. It feels silly and they should have left it be. You know that they say, if it isn’t broke, don’t fix it.

Also note that you can now voice search, much like Android phones.

iOS 7 Functionality

This is where Apple impressed me. The aesthetic changes were an extremely mixed bag, but the functionality changes were across the board positives. The speed to open apps is unrivaled at this point, and the way it pulls you into the app instead of simply opening it is a nice touch.

I felt that in general the phone was a lot more snappy and quick while moving from app to app. The only issue I’ve had functionality wise is that Siri is currently broken. Now I don’t know if this is because of the phone or the update, and am not going to hold it against Apple right this very moment, but it is an issue that is apparent as this time.

iOS 7 Apps

While I’ll show you the difference in design for a lot of the apps, the only two apps that seem to function differently are the camera and the music player.

iTunes Radio – This is the music player that iPhone users have deserved for a long time. It’s clean and simple and runs really well. I love the design of it, and found navigating through it was a breeze.

Camera – The camera is essentially the same, Apple just made a handful of thoughtful additions to it, including the ability to add filters on the fly, like Instagram, but not… Instagram..

iOS 7 New Features

Parallax effects and a new App Cleaning function are really the highlights of the new features at this time. I’m sure as we get further into development Apple will add more new features, including access to Airdrop, which I couldn’t use at this time.

Parallax Effects – Ok, these are silly and unnecessary, but dang-it they look cool! With the parallax, you get the effect of depth with your screen, which is compounded by the fact that the background shifts and skews as you twist and turn the phone, really adding to the depth effect.

App Cleaning – Goodness, I honestly can’t believe it has taken Apple this long to implement a quality app cleaning function. The App Cleaning function that Android and Windows use are extremely intuitive; and the Apple version is no different. Flinging apps up causes them to close-out, helping to conserve your battery life and improve overall performance.

Conclusion

The GoodSpeedy, Intuitive and finally adding features that the other OS’s have had for a long time now. New iTunes Radio and App Cleaning functions are handy and feel like they should have been introduced a few iterations ago.

The BadVector.. Really, Apple? The feel of the new colors and icons is extremely hipster and may turn off more serious or mature users. I still would like to see widgets instead of just little app bubble icons.

The UglyWhy is Siri broken?? On top of that the phone runs extremely hot with this new update. We’re not talking thermal meltdown, but rather uncomfortable in the hand after 30-45 minutes of use.

Other ThoughtsI feel that Apple really hasn’t take a huge leap forward with this new “revolutionary” iOS 7 update. Yes, it’s an upgrade on iOS 6, I’m not denying that – BUT where is the features that have become common-place with the competition that Apple still lacks?

The design is silly in my opinion, but the speed and functionality increases make this a worthwhile upgrade. We can only hope that it gets better as it gets closer to release.

How varying are opinions on the new iOS so far? Well check out some thoughts from the RepairLabs staff. And remember, the next time you break your iPhone or need to get your iPad repaired, to think of your friends here at RepairLabs! 

Taylor ~ Lead Repair Technician - It's ugly.. The flat bright colors for the icons just looks flat out stupid. I'm definitely going to Android. 

Jason ~ I.T. Manager - I don't understand why they went away from the old icons, there was nothing wrong with them. The new parallax effects are cool, but the icons are bad. 

Brittany ~ Nobody Knows What Brittany Does - I love it! Granted, I understand why guys who aren't hipsters may not like it, but it's so bright and happy! 

Michelle ~ Graphic Designer - The vector design is really eye-catching, and I like it. It definitely has a hipster feel to it, but I still like iOS 7. 

Overall, Yes, I would recommend upgrading your iPhone to iOS 7 when it becomes available to the public.

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